Small rhombidodecahedron

Small rhombidodecahedron

Type
Uniform star polyhedron

Elements
F = 42, E = 120
V = 60 (χ = −18)

Faces by sides
30{4}+12{10}

Wythoff symbol
2 5 (3/2 5/2) |

Symmetry group
Ih, [5,3], *532

Index references
U39, C46, W74

Dual polyhedron
Small rhombidodecacron

Vertex figure

4.10.4/3.10/9

Bowers acronym
Sird

In geometry, the small rhombidodecahedron is a nonconvex uniform polyhedron, indexed as U39. Its vertex figure is a crossed quadrilateral.

Contents

1 Related polyhedra

1.1 Small rhombidodecacron

2 References
3 External links

Related polyhedra[edit]
It shares its vertex arrangement with the small stellated truncated dodecahedron and the uniform compounds of 6 or 12 pentagrammic prisms. It additionally shares its edge arrangement with the rhombicosidodecahedron (having the square faces in common), and with the small dodecicosidodecahedron (having the decagonal faces in common).

Rhombicosidodecahedron

Small dodecicosidodecahedron

Small rhombidodecahedron

Small stellated truncated dodecahedron

Compound of six pentagrammic prisms

Compound of twelve pentagrammic prisms

Small rhombidodecacron[edit]

Small rhombidodecacron

Type
Star polyhedron

Face

Elements
F = 60, E = 120
V = 42 (χ = −18)

Symmetry group
Ih, [5,3], *532

Index references
DU39

dual polyhedron
Small rhombidodecahedron

The small rhombidodecacron is a nonconvex isohedral polyhedron. It is the dual of the small rhombidodecahedron. It is visually identical to the Small dodecacronic hexecontahedron. It has 60 intersecting antiparallelogram faces.
References[edit]

Wenninger, Magnus (1983), Dual Models, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 978-0-521-54325-5, MR 730208 

External links[edit]

Weisstein, Eric W. “Small rhombidodecahedron”. MathWorld. 

Weisstein, Eric W. “Small rhombidodecacron”. MathWorld. 

Uniform polyhedra and duals

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Star-polyhedra navigator

Kepler-Poinsot
polyhedra (nonconvex
regular polyhedra)

small stellated dodecahedron
great dodecahedron
great stellated dodecahedron
great icosahedron

Uniform truncations
of Kepler-Poinsot
polyhedra

dodecadodecahedron
truncated great dodecahedron
rhombidodecadodecahedron
truncated dodecadodecahedron
snub dodecadodecahedron
great icosidodecahedron
truncated great icosahedron
nonconvex great rhombicosidodecahedron
great truncated icosidodecahedron

Nonconvex uniform
Hemipolyhedra

tetrahemihexahedron
cubohemioctahe

Al-Muktafi

For the 12th-century caliph, see Al-Muqtafi. For the Palestinian legal database, see Al-Muqtafi (legal and judicial).

al-Muktafī bi-llāh

Gold dinar of al-Muktafi, minted at Baghdad in 904/5

17th Caliph of the Abbasid Caliphate

Reign
5 April 902 – 13 August 908

Predecessor
al-Mu’tadid

Successor
al-Muqtadir

Born
877/8

Died
13 August 908 (aged 31)
Baghdad, Abbasid Caliphate, now Iraq

Issue
al-Mustakfi

Dynasty
Abbasid

Father
al-Mu’tadid

Religion
Sunni Islam

Abū Muḥammad ʿAlī ibn Aḥmad (Arabic: أبو أحمد علي بن أحمد‎‎; 877/878 – 13 August 908), better known by his regnal name al-Muktafī bi-llāh (Arabic: المكتفي بالله‎‎, “Content with God Alone”[1]), was the Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad from 902 to 908. More liberal and sedentary than his militaristic father al-Mu’tadid, al-Muktafi essentially continued his policies, although most of the actual conduct of government was left to his viziers and officials. His reign saw the defeat of the Qarmatians of the Syrian Desert, and the reincorporation of Egypt and the parts of Syria ruled by the Tulunid dynasty. The war with the Byzantine Empire continued with alternating success, although the Arabs scored a major victory in the Sack of Thessalonica in 904. His death in 908 opened the way for the installation of a weak ruler, al-Muqtadir, by the palace bureaucracy, and began the terminal decline of the Abbasid Caliphate.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Caliphate

2.1 Character and government
2.2 Campaigns against the Qarmatians
2.3 Recovery of Tulunid Syria and Egypt
2.4 The Byzantine front
2.5 Death and legacy

3 Footnotes
4 References
5 Sources

Early life[edit]
Ali ibn Ahmad was born in 877/8, the son of Ahmad ibn Talha, the future caliph al-Mu’tadid (r. 892–902) by a Turkish slave-girl, named Čiček (“flower”, Jījak in Arabic).[2][3]
At the time of his birth, the Abbasid Caliphate was still reeling from the decade-long civil war known as the “Anarchy at Samarra”, which had begun with the assassination of Caliph al-Mutawakkil (r. 847–861) by dissatisfied soldiers and ended with the accession of al-Mu’tamid (r. 870–892). Real power, however, lay with al-Mu’tamid’s brother, al-Muwaffaq, Ali’s paternal grandfather. Al-Muwaffaq enjoyed the loyalty of the military, and by 877 had established himself as the de facto ruler of the state.[4] Caliphal authority in the provinces collapsed during the “Anarchy at Samarra”, with the result that b

Consolation payment

Consolation payments is payment given to relatives of civilians who have died accidentally.
US Representative John Murtha has said that the United States has paid $5 million in consolation payments to the Iraqis in 2004 and $20 million in 2005.[1]
References[edit]

^ Meet the Press- Transcript for June 11

See also[edit]

Iraq War

  
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Wang Yuanqi

This is a Chinese name; the family name is Wang (王).

Wang Yuanqi

Born
1642
Taicang, Jiangsu

Died
1715 (1716) (aged 73)

Known for
Shan shui

Movement
Six Masters of the early Qing period, Four Wangs

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Wang Yuanqi.

Wang Yuanqi (Chinese: 王原祁; pinyin: Wáng Yuánqí; 1642-1715) was a Chinese painter of the Qing dynasty.[1]
Wang was born in Taicang in the Jiangsu province[2] and tutored in painting by his grandfather Wang Shimin (1592–1680).[3] His style name was ‘Mao-ching ‘ and his sobriquet was ‘ Lu-t’ai’. Wang is a member of the Six Masters of the early Qing period, also known as the ‘Four Wangs, a Wu and a Yun’. They are also often regarded as the principal figures of the ‘Orthodox School’ of Chinese landscape painting.
Wang Yuanqi was two years old when the New Qing Dynasty was founded (1644). He rose to prominence as a court official and eventually was appointed curator of the imperial collection during the reign of the Qing Emperor Kangxi. He remained a court official throughout his long career and died at age 73 in 1715.[3]
His landscapes followed the model of the Yuan Dynasty artists who broke away from the Northern Song tradition of rendering landscapes “real enough to walk through” to more personal abstractions. His style and technique demonstrates influences from, for example, the artist Huang Gongwang, especially in the use of dry brush strokes and ink washes and his use of colour, often making “colour patterns a component of his dense compositional structure, complementing the force of abstract design with the rhythmic flow of colour.”[4] His 1711 ink and color-on-silk painting, Landscape in the Style of Huang Gongwang, is in Singapore’s Asian Civilisations Museum collection and his version of Wang Wei’s (now lost) eighth century hand scroll, The Wang River Villa, also painted in 1711, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City.[1]

Wang Yuanqi’s Mountain Dwelling on a Summer Day

Notes[edit]

^ a b “Wang Yuanqi: Wangchuan Villa, China, Qing dynasty”. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 
^ “Wang Yuanqi Brief Biography”. Retrieved 2008-09-11. 
^ a b Pang, Mae Anna. “An Orthodox Master and an Individualist: Wang Yuanqi and Daoji”. Art Journal of Victoria. Victoria, Australia: National Gallery of Victoria. 47. Retrieved 18 December 2016. 
^ Jerome Silbergeld. Chinese Painting Style: Media, Methods, and Principles o

András Bozóki

This biography of a living person needs additional citations for verification. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (April 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

András Bozóki

Minister of Culture of Hungary

In office
14 February 2005 – 9 June 2006

Preceded by
István Hiller

Succeeded by
István Hiller (Minister of Education and Culture)

Personal details

Born
(1959-01-23) 23 January 1959 (age 58)
Budapest, People’s Republic of Hungary

Political party
Independent

Profession
politologist, sociologist, politician

The native form of this personal name is Bozóki András. This article uses Western name order when mentioning individuals.
András Bozóki (born 23 January 1959) is a Hungarian sociologist and politician, who served as Minister of Culture between 2005 and 2006.
References[edit]

External links[edit]

Curriculum vitae

Political offices

Preceded by
István Hiller
Minister of Culture
2005–2006
Succeeded by
István Hiller

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Ministers of Education of Hungary since 1848

Revolution of 1848

J. Eötvös
Batthyány
Horváth

Kingdom of Hungary

J. Eötvös
Szlávy
Pauler
Trefort
Baross
Csáky
L. Eötvös
Wlassics
Berzeviczy
G. Lukács (*1865)
Tost
Apponyi
Székely
Zichy
Jankovich
Apponyi
Zichy

Transition period

Lovászy
Juhász Nagy
Kunfi
G. Lukács (*1885)
Pogány (opposed by P. Teleki)
Garbai
Imre
Huszár

Regency

Haller
Jó. Vass
Klebelsberg
Ernszt
Karafiáth
Hóman
P. Teleki
Hóman
Szinyei Merse
Antal
Rakovszky

Transition period

Rajniss
Szálasi
G. Teleki
Keresztury

Communist Hungary

Ortutay
Darvas
Erdey-Grúz
Kónya
Kállai
Benke
Ilku
Nagy
Polinszky
Pozsgay
Köpeczi
Czibere
Glatz

Republic of Hungary

Andrásfalvy
Mádl
Fodor
Magyar
Pokorni
Pálinkás
Magyar
Hiller

Ministers of Culture

Révai
Darvas
G. Lukács (*1885)
Orbán
Pozsgay
Hámori
Rockenbauer
Görgey
Hiller
Bozóki

Minister of Religion

Já. Vass

Minister of Higher Education

Erdey-Grúz

Minister of National/Human Resources

Réthelyi
Balog

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 69002069
LCCN: n91078996
ISNI: 0000 0001 1069 1421
GND: 103224823
SUDOC: 032362714
BNF: cb12340688p (data)
NKC: jo2015873615

Thi

James Haldane Stewart

James Haldane Stewart

James Haldane Stewart (December 22, 1778 – 22 October 1854), was rector of Limpsfield, Surrey, where he lies buried. He was the third son of Duncan Stewart of Ardsheal, 10th Chief of Clan Appin (died 1793) who married (1767) Anne Erving of Boston. Anne Erving was the daughter of Hon. John Erving of Connecticut, loyalist governor of Boston and a member of his majesty’s Council for the Province and his wife Anne Shirley, who was herself daughter of William Shirley colonial Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay and owner of the Shirley-Eustis House . James Haldane Stewart married Mary Dale (daughter of David Dale).

Contents

1 Early life
2 Ordination
3 Activities
4 Publications
5 James Haldane Stewart Junior
6 Sources
7 References

Early life[edit]
James Haldane Stewart was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was educated at Dr Valpy’s school in Reading, Berkshire and Eton College, after which he trained at Lincoln’s Inn, for a career in law. Stewart was converted in 1802 through his contact with the Anglican clergyman William Marsh (priest) and Thomas Tyndale.
Ordination[edit]
Stewart matriculated in 1803 at Exeter College, Oxford and graduated B.A. in 1806 and M.A. in 1810. He was ordained and appointed Curate of Ashampstead in Berkshire. From 1812 to 1828 he officiated at Percy Chapel in London despite suffering a breakdown in health in 1817 which necessitated a visit to the Continent.
He was the first minister of St Bride’s Church, Liverpool, (1831) naming the street, Percy Street, after the Percy Chapel, also in Percy Street, London.
Activities[edit]
Stewart was an active supporter of the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews (a Jewish Christian missionary society now known as the Church’s Ministry Among Jewish People or CMJ), the Church Missionary Society and the Protestant Reformation Society. He built his own chapel in Liverpool and ministered there from 1830 to 1846. Stewart after 1820 was a strong advocate of prayer for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. Stewart was Rector of Limpsfield in Surrey during his final years.
Publications[edit]
In 1820 The Rev. James Haldane Stewart published “Hints for the General Union of Christians for the Outpouring of the Spirit”.
James Haldane Stewart Junior[edit]
Rev. James Haldane Stewart Jr., his elder son, (died 24 February 1879) was curate at Limpsfield, and married Emily Katherine Leveson-Gower, daughter of William Leveson-Gower, of Titsey Pl

Lave Cross

Lave Cross

Third baseman / Catcher

Born: (1866-05-12)May 12, 1866
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Died: September 6, 1927(1927-09-06) (aged 61)
Toledo, Ohio

Batted: Right
Threw: Right

MLB debut

April 23, 1887, for the Louisville Colonels

Last MLB appearance

June 6, 1907, for the Washington Senators

MLB statistics

AVG
.292

Home runs
47

RBI
1371

Hits
2645

Teams

Louisville Colonels (1887–1888)
Philadelphia Athletics (AA) (1889)
Philadelphia Quakers/Athletics (PL/AA) (1890–1891)
Philadelphia Phillies (1892–1897)
St. Louis Browns (1898)
Cleveland Spiders (1899)
St. Louis Perfectos/Cardinals (1899–1900)
Brooklyn Superbas (1900)
Philadelphia Athletics (AL) (1901–1905)
Washington Senators (1906–1907)

Lafayette Napoleon Cross (May 12, 1866 – September 6, 1927) was an American third baseman in Major League Baseball who played most of his 21-year career with Philadelphia-based teams in four different leagues. One of the sport’s top all-around players in the years surrounding the turn of the 20th century, when he retired he ranked fifth in major league history in hits (2,644) and runs batted in (1,371), ninth in doubles (411) and total bases (3,466), and third in games played (2,275) and at bats (9,064). Also starring on defense, after beginning his major league career as a catcher, he led third basemen in fielding percentage five times, and ended his career with nearly every fielding record at that position: games (1,721), putouts (2,306), assists (3,706), total chances (6,406), and fielding average (.938); his 212 double plays ranked third behind Billy Nash and Arlie Latham. He captained the Philadelphia Athletics teams which captured two of the first five American League pennants.
His older brother Amos was a major league catcher from 1885 to 1887, and his younger brother Frank played one game in right field for the 1901 Cleveland Blues.

Contents

1 Career
2 Other achievements
3 See also
4 External links
5 References

Career[edit]
Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Lave Cross began his career as a secondary catcher and occasional outfielder with the 1887-1888 Louisville Colonels. His contract was sold to the Philadelphia Athletics of the American Association for the 1889 season, and he jumped to the Philadelphia Quakers of the Players’ League in 1890 before returning to the AA team in 1891. That season he saw his first regular play, splitting time in the outfield and behind the pl

Aragonite sea

The alternation of calcite and aragonite seas through geologic time.

An aragonite sea contains aragonite and high-magnesium calcite as the primary inorganic carbonate precipitates. Therefore, the chemical conditions of the seawater must be notably high in magnesium content for an aragonite sea to form. This is in contrast to a calcite sea in which low-magnesium calcite is the primary inorganic marine calcium carbonate precipitate.
The Early Paleozoic and the Middle to Late Mesozoic oceans were predominantly calcite seas, whereas the Middle Paleozoic through the Early Mesozoic and the Cenozoic (including today) are characterized by aragonite seas.[1][2][3][4][5]
Aragonite seas form due to several factors, the most obvious of these is a high magnesium content. However, the sea level and the temperature of the surrounding system also determine whether an aragonite sea will form.[6]
Calcite seas occurred at times of rapid seafloor spreading and global greenhouse climate conditions.[7] Calcite is the predominant mineral in warm, shallow marine environments. Aragonite on the other hand, is the dominant mineral in cool marine water environments.
This trend has been observed by looking at the chemistry of carbonates, dating them and analyzing the conditions under which they were formed. One study has examined the temporal and spatial distribution of limestone-marl alternations in Ordovician, Jurassic and Cretaceous (times of calcite seas). This study concluded that the most abundant of the limestone-marl alternations occurred in settings similar to today’s seas which favor aragonite production.[8]
Citations[edit]

^ Wilkinson, Owen & Carroll 1985
^ Wilkinson & Given 1986
^ Morse & Mackenzie 1990
^ Lowenstein et al. 2001
^ Palmer & Wilson 2004
^ Adabi 2004
^ Stanley & Hardy 1999
^ Westphall & Munnecke 2003

References[edit]

Cherns, L., Wright, V.P. (2000). “Missing molluscs as evidence of large-scale, early skeletal aragonite dissolution in a Silurian Sea”. Geology. 28 (9): 791–794. Bibcode:2000Geo….28..791C. doi:10.1130/0091-7613(2000)28<791:MMAEOL>2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0091-7613.  CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
Harper, E.M., Palmer, T.J., Alphey, J.R. (1997). “Evolutionary response by bivalves to changing Phanerozoic sea-water chemistry”. Geological Magazine. 134: 403–407. doi:10.1017/S0016756897007061.  CS1 maint: Uses authors parameter (link)
Lowenstein, T.K.; Timofeeff, M.N.; Brennan, S.T.; Hardie,

Linley’s Dungeon Crawl

This article is about the computer game by Linley Henzell. For the active open source version, see Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup. For the 2014 indie game, see Crawl (video game). For the general style of adventure it is named after, see dungeon crawl.

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Linley’s Dungeon Crawl

Developer(s)

Linley Henzell
Crawl devteam

Designer(s)
Linley Henzell

Platform(s)
Cross-platform

Release date(s)
2 October 1997

Genre(s)
Roguelike

Mode(s)
Single player

Linley’s Dungeon Crawl (or just Dungeon Crawl or Crawl) is a roguelike computer game originally programmed by Linley Henzell in 1995, and first released to the general public on October 2, 1997.[1] Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup, a branch of Dungeon Crawl currently in development, is one of the most popular roguelikes being played today.[citation needed] The original game has been licensed under a quirky license based on Bison’s license and the NetHack License;[2] Stone Soup has contacted every past contributor and relicensed to GPLv2+.

Contents

1 Overview
2 Typical Dungeon Crawl screen
3 Versions
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Overview[edit]
Crawl starts with the player’s choice of one of over twenty races: several different types of elves, dwarves, humans, ogres, tengu, centaurs, merfolk, and other fantasy beings. Racial selection sets base attributes, future skill advancement, and physical characteristics such as movement, resistances, and special abilities.
Subject to racial exclusions, the pla

Potatiskorv

A slice of potatiskorv, which in Sweden is better known as värmlandskorv.

Potatiskorv (more commonly known as värmlandskorv in Sweden) is a regional Swedish sausage from Värmland, made with ground pork, beef, onions and potatoes. Potatiskorv is traditionally served hot at Christmas in Värmland but often served hot or cold throughout the year.
Ingredients: 2/3 potatoes, 1/3 meat (half beef, half unseasoned pork), 3/4 lb onions per each lb of meat. Seasoning: 1-1/2 tblsp salt and 3/4 scant tsp pepper per pound of meat.
Recipe: 10 lbs potatoes, 2.5 lbs lean beef, 2.5 lbs lean pork, 3.75 lbs onions, 7.5 tblsp salt, 3.5 tsp pepper. Medium or coarse grind potatoes and onions, mix well with ground meat and seasoning. Stuff gently in 12″ segments of salted pork casings (well rinsed and softened in warm water). Cover with mildly salted water and bring to gentle boil for one hour, pricking skins @ 2″ intervals to vent pressure and prevent bursting. Makes about 20 lbs.
“Potatiskorv” is what this sausage is called in parts of Värmland. In most parts of Sweden, the word “potatiskorv” is unknown, while “värmlandskorv” is well known and sold commercially around Christmas throughout the country, for the benefit of people from Värmland. In the United States, “potatiskorv” (usually written “potatis korv”) is the name that has stuck among people with Swedish roots.
There is also a local sausage in parts of Småland known as “potatiskorv”, mentioned in the Emil children’s books by Astrid Lindgren. However, that sausage contains no beef, only potatoes and pork.
See also[edit]

List of sausages

References[edit]

Livingston, A.D. (1998). Sausage. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press. ISBN 1-55821-526-3. 

External links[edit]

Potatis korv recipe from Odebolt in Iowa Linked 2012-10-29
Cut-and-paste kitchen blog, June 9, 2008: Potatis Korv – a knowledge lost Linked 2012-10-29
Potatiskorv on the table: Reflections of a Fourth-Generation Swedish-American Linked 2012-10-29

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Sausage

Overview

Casings
List of sausages
List of sausage dishes
Sausage making

Fresh sausage

Biała kiełbasa
Boerewors
Boudin
Braadworst
Bratwurst
Breakfast
Carniolan
Falukorv
Knackwurst
Kohlwurst
Kupati
Merguez
Thüringer
Weisswurst

Dry sausage

Salami

Cacciatore
Ciauscolo
Genoa salami
Soppressata
Prasky

Other

Chinese
Chorizo
Fuet
Landjäger
Longaniza
Lukanka
Metworst
Pepperoni
Saucisson
Sobrassada
Sujuk

Smoked sausage